Monday Go Meditation: Game 69

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Introduction

In today’s go meditation, I am glad to welcome back fellow friend and go player Bonscott. For those who don’t remember, I’ve played a number of even games against Bonscott (even though there is a few stones difference between our ranks) and actually lost quite a few of them before. So when he challenged me to a game recently, I made sure to not underestimate him!
In terms of the game, you’ll get to see the rather uncommon 3-3 opening. In addition, this is a good game for study in regards to the importance of selecting the correct strategy in conjunction with your opening moves. As you progress through the game, you will notice that Black’s attempt to shift from territorial to moyo and how it results in a difficult uphill battle for Black.
Finally, in light of Halloween last Friday, I’ve included a fun life and death problem with a pretty detailed variations at the end of the game. Hope that you enjoy this game!

 

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[download label=”Download Kifu”]http://bengozen.com//wp-content/uploads/2014/10/2014.11.03-MGM-69.sgf[/download]

One Point Lesson

When choosing your strategy, keep in mind how well your opening moves will work with it.

About the author

BenGoZen

<span class="dsq-postid" data-dsqidentifier="5911 http://bengozen.com//?p=5911">21 comments</span>

  • I think 3-3 feels so slow. When white already has 6.5 points at the start black must have bigger ambitions than such a small corner. I could imagine playing it as white though. Starting with a safe corner and komi is as bad. Well played anyway, the way you settled on the right side was really nice, something I will definitely take away from this review.

  • I think 3-3 feels so slow. When white already has 6.5 points at the start black must have bigger ambitions than such a small corner. I could imagine playing it as white though. Starting with a safe corner and komi is as bad. Well played anyway, the way you settled on the right side was really nice, something I will definitely take away from this review.

    • The use of 3-3 is more of a style preference than anything else, but I totally hear you on the fact that it is rather slow against komi. In a no komi game though, perfectly viable otherwise.
      Glad you enjoyed the review!

  • very nice review like always….XD and i would like to point out a key move in one of your variation which you had option to choose between D5 and G2…the variation i would like to point is the D5 variation, after b attached at h2 and white respond with j2. for b to live is to descend at h1, with that descend w cannot kill black anymore, but please correct me if i’m wrong..XD

  • very nice review like always….XD and i would like to point out a key move in one of your variation which you had option to choose between D5 and G2…the variation i would like to point is the D5 variation, after b attached at h2 and white respond with j2. for b to live is to descend at h1, with that descend w cannot kill black anymore, but please correct me if i’m wrong..XD

    • You are absolutely correct! See how weak my life and death skills are? Haha. Didn’t even consider the descent as an option. Thanks for pointing this out!

      • it is a complicated variation so it not easy to keep in check all things…. but i’m glad to help. Don’t see you around in kgs for a while now..you still play there?

          • same here…..been busy for these few month but keeping up by studying tesuji and endgame……don’t know if i have improvement since the last time i played there but i might just go played a game to test on my reading abilities later…XD

  • nice and amusing game πŸ™‚
    About the ko at the top – you don’t really need to descent first, since it’s a ko threat for you, as if you take the ko and black played there, you just connect… and black suffers from too many liberty issues and cutting points to survive this. It would not be a ko at all if he does that πŸ™‚ So it’s just a free ko threat.

  • The opening was interesting and unusual… the position that appears on the bottom edge with the black shimari facing white’s 4-4 appears in almost every (if not in all) opening theory book or opening problem book that ever came out… It’s almost always the biggest edge on the board this early because it’s 3 stones all wanting to develop on that edge.
    So the normal theory is that whoever plays there first gets the edge (pun is totally intended…)
    You actually have 2 options there. one is where you mentioned – right in the middle at K3. The other option is L3. It’s actually a more modern, active way to handle that edge, where white leaves invasion space but gets to make black’s part of the formation suffer more. Both are ok.
    Not sure about the top right. I would personally finish the joseki once it started because I think it’s a simple way to give white a better game as well πŸ™‚
    Interesting approach. Personally I treat complicated continuations as overplays if there’s a simple one that works (and almost always play them otherwise πŸ˜› )
    but the star point on the left side… I can’t bet my life on it, but I’m pretty sure that showing it to a professional or a similarly strong player would get the response that it might be ok but the lower edge is still bigger… 3 stones want to develop there vs. 2 on the left… That’s the way I interpret that anyway.
    Once black decided to not take your base on the right side (he could have tried) and let you settle there easily, I think you needed to try hard to lose from that point πŸ™‚ you were far ahead.
    Nice game. I enjoyed it

  • nice and amusing game πŸ™‚
    About the ko at the top – you don’t really need to descent first, since it’s a ko threat for you, as if you take the ko and black played there, you just connect… and black suffers from too many liberty issues and cutting points to survive this. It would not be a ko at all if he does that πŸ™‚ So it’s just a free ko threat.

    • Ah. Excellent point. For some reason I thought that Black would play there instead as a ko threat, but you are absolutely right. Thanks for the insight!

  • The opening was interesting and unusual… the position that appears on the bottom edge with the black shimari facing white’s 4-4 appears in almost every (if not in all) opening theory book or opening problem book that ever came out… It’s almost always the biggest edge on the board this early because it’s 3 stones all wanting to develop on that edge.
    So the normal theory is that whoever plays there first gets the edge (pun is totally intended…)
    You actually have 2 options there. one is where you mentioned – right in the middle at K3. The other option is L3. It’s actually a more modern, active way to handle that edge, where white leaves invasion space but gets to make black’s part of the formation suffer more. Both are ok.
    Not sure about the top right. I would personally finish the joseki once it started because I think it’s a simple way to give white a better game as well πŸ™‚
    Interesting approach. Personally I treat complicated continuations as overplays if there’s a simple one that works (and almost always play them otherwise πŸ˜› )
    but the star point on the left side… I can’t bet my life on it, but I’m pretty sure that showing it to a professional or a similarly strong player would get the response that it might be ok but the lower edge is still bigger… 3 stones want to develop there vs. 2 on the left… That’s the way I interpret that anyway.
    Once black decided to not take your base on the right side (he could have tried) and let you settle there easily, I think you needed to try hard to lose from that point πŸ™‚ you were far ahead.
    Nice game. I enjoyed it

    • Thank you for the in depth advice! Though the game ended up being a big difference, the game overall still held a bit of a challenge for me as I tried to figure out what to do. You make an excellent point about how “complicated continuations tend to be overplays.” I am probably quite guilty of that as I am usually eager to plunge into the abyss of a fight (though it probably leaves me at a disadvantage more often than not. Haha).
      Glad you enjoyed the game! Hopefully we will have a chance to play against one another in the near future!

      • actually, complications are fine… and often correct. it’s just that going for them if you have an easy solution without them seems strange to me. I still like to complicated things a lot (basically since my fellow equally ranked players won’t let me get simple solutions (that I can find) that easily… so complications is often the way to go πŸ™‚

        • Fair enough. I think part of my issue is that I try to do everything as efficiently as possible. So when I feel like I’m only getting like a 70% efficiency rate, I abandon it because of my greed for the 100% efficiency. Haha. A flaw that I will certainly have to work on.

          • well, you SHOULD strive for 100% efficiency. That’s what professionals do. efficiency, by definition is ALWAYS good. but if you go for 110%, you lose πŸ™‚ so never settle for low efficiency… but a game of Go cannot be won several times in a row without the result reversing in the middle… you can’t win, and win by more, and then by more… there’s only “win”… so if you’re not sure you’re not stretching beyond the 100% efficiency and want to make sure… THEN it’s the time to ask if you really need it.
            I think in the opening in this game it seemed clear that your position is quite good if you just play normally. if you didn’t think so, then you were correct in trying to play something else. if you thought so yourself…. then why? πŸ™‚
            Because telling yourself you’re just looking for more efficiency can easily be a self comforting lie – as you will notice – you provided no explanation as to why you thought the tenuki seemed better than the normal variation, or why you didn’t like the position itself, so it doesn’t seem like there was any attempt to improve efficiency there… just experimentation… which can be nice sometimes, as long as you realize that’s what you’re doing…
            and that the immediate result is often not good πŸ™‚
            The difficult part of playing well (not near perfect…just well), is in forcing ourselves to not lie to ourselves, to have the self discipline to go over our options, and their ups and down, to ask ourselves the right questions, and to avoid playing on instinct when we have time to check if it is misleading us…
            I fail that all the time myself.
            Most people do.
            How often do you play something only to tell yourself afterwards that you actually missed something you have encountered many times before and that you just played too fast not realizing it? or that you ignored something you’ve seen a hundred times? for the vast majority of people, the answer is – quite often indeed. Myself included…
            Reading ability may come with practice. The same could be said of shape recognition, counting, openings etc.
            self discipline is the one thing which will always be a foe to most people, regardless of how knowledgeable, skilled or trained they are.

          • Well said. I’ll be sure to keep these things in mind as I continue reviewing my games. Perhaps I will try and add more rationale to each move as I go through them instead of just commenting on my mood at the time. Thanks for your in depth insight!

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